Justice For Laughing Boy

Justice for Laughing Boy By Sara Ryan

I remember it well. I was only too happy to hear my email ping and find the next bulletin of the Laughing Boy blog arrive. I opened it somewhat surreptitiously, sitting as I was in a busy but boring workshop, and read on. I read that Laughing Boy had died.

I felt physically sick. I left the conference hall  and cried.

I still think of LB often.

In Justice for Laughing Boy Sara Ryan tells the shocking story of how her son Connor, Laughing Boy, died in an ATU in Oxfordshire. He was a handsome young man with the future ahead of him, ideally involving a, ‘haulage company and a beautiful brown eyed woman’. He had learning difficulties and epilepsy and as some young men do was experiencing a hard time with anxiety and sometimes unpredictable rage. He was admitted to Slade House in Oxfordshire, an NHS Treatment and Assessment Unit, where he was under the care of a team of psychologists and ‘experts’. This is where he died, a young man with epilepsy drowned unattended in a bath.

This book is written with all the warmth, charm and humour that drew me to Sara’s blog in the first place. Many anecdotes stick with you long after reading. Many are laugh out loud funny. But what is not funny is that Sara has spent the last 3 years searching for accountability, apologies and justice. This is a story that starts with the joy, the unpredictability and the simple weirdness of living with a dude like Connor and moves on to the massive unrelenting task of fighting for justice 3 years after his preventable death.

Sara and her incredible band of supporters have waged war on a system that is convoluted, obfuscating and weighted against families. With resilience and tenacity they have stood their ground, they have pushed and cajoled as they fight to bring some kind of meaning to this awful and untimely death. Some of this has been played out in public meetings, court rooms and lawyers offices. Some of it on flags at festivals, on buses in Asturia and much of it on social media in a campaign that has caught the hearts of thousands.

But from every angle this has been an unjust war. Why should a mother have to fight so hard for justice when her son died in an institution charged to help him, in a bath.

This is a book that should never have had to be written, but it is a book that demands to be read.

 

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